Conditions We Treat

Our team at Boston PainCare is a circle of experts across several disciplines. We examine your condition and approach it from several sides rather than a single solution. Some might call it innovative, but we like to think of it as inspired—by the patients we see improving everyday. We provide expert care for patients suffering with back, neck, and nerve pain in the extremities as well as painful joint conditions. We understand that chronic pain can impact all aspects of physical and psychological well-being, and we are here to help you get back to enjoying your life.

Boston PainCare offers a wide range of services to treat chronic pain. With a full range of state-of-the-art treatments, procedures and therapies, following are just some of the conditions we can treat:

The spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that carries messages between the brain and the rest of the body. Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is due to a traumatic injury that either results in a bruise (also called a contusion), a partial tear, or a complete tear (called a transection) in the spinal cord. SCI is a common cause of permanent disability and death in children.

Patients who have arthritis of the hip, or osteoarthritis, sometimes have problems walking. Pain can appear in different locations, including the groin, thigh, buttocks, or knee and can be stabbing, sharp or a dull ache, and the hip is often stiff.The causes of osteoarthritis of the hip are not known. Factors that may contribute include improperly formed joints, genetic defects, joint injury, increasing age, and being overweight. Early diagnosis and treatment can help patients maintain mobility and function by preventing severe damage to the joint.

Bursitis is a painful condition that affects the joints. Bursae are fluid-filled sacs that act as a cushion between bones, tendons, joints, and muscles. When these sacs become inflamed it is called bursitis. There are over 150 bursae in the human body. They cushion and lubricate points between the bones, tendons, and muscles near the joints. The bursae are lined with synovial cells. Synovial cells produce a lubricant that reduces friction between tissues. This cushioning and lubrication allows our joints to move easily.

When a person has bursitis, or inflammation of the bursa, movement or pressure is painful. Overuse, injury, and sometimes an infection from gout or rheumatoid arthritis may cause bursitis. Hips, knees, ankles and other joints can be affected by bursitis.

Cervical Radiculopathy is the damage or disturbance of nerve function that results if one of the nerve roots near the cervical vertebrae is compressed. Damage to nerve roots in the cervical area can cause pain and the loss of sensation along the nerve’s pathway into the arm and hand, depending on where the damaged roots are located. Damage can occur as a result of pressure from material from a ruptured disc, degenerative changes in bones, arthritis or other injuries that put pressure on the nerve roots.

In middle-aged people, normal degenerative changes in the discs can cause pressure on nerve roots. In younger people, cervical radiculopathy tends to be the result of a ruptured disc, perhaps as a result of trauma. This disc material then compresses or inflames the nerve root, causing pain. The main symptom of cervical radiculopathy is pain that spreads into the arm, neck, chest, upper back and/or shoulders. A person with radiculopathy may experience muscle weakness and/or numbness or tingling in fingers or hands.

Living with chronic pain can affect every aspect of your life. Chronic pain can keep you from participating in your favorite activities, socializing with friends or traveling. Chronic pain also can severely affect your mood. Many people living with chronic pain experience anxiety, depression, loneliness and a feeling of hopelessness.

A good coping strategy is essential for people living with chronic pain. Since pain is completely internal and subjective, only the person experiencing it can determine its severity. Conversely, only that person can work to control their pain. The good news is that if you have chronic neck and back pain due to pinched nerves, ruptured discs, sciatica, foraminal stenosis or another spinal condition, there are a number of pain management that can help.

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), also known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), is a disorder of a portion of the body, usually the arms or legs, which manifests as pain, swelling, limited range of motion, and changes to the skin and bones. It may initially affect one limb and then spread throughout the body; although many people report symptoms throughout their whole bodies. There are multiple names for this disease, as well as two subtypes. Type I (also called reflex sympathetic dystrophy) refers to CRPS without evidence of a specific peripheral nerve injury. Type II refers to when there is specific evidence of a nerve injury. While the cause of CRPS is unknown, it can occur after an injury to the area in question such as a fracture or after surgery.

Degenerative disc disease is an age-related condition that happens when one or more of the discs between the vertebrae of the spinal column deteriorates or breaks down, leading to pain. There may be weakness, numbness, and pain that radiates down the leg. Degenerative disc disease is not a disease, but a natural occurrence that comes with aging. The rubbery discs between the vertebrae normally allow for flexing and bending of the back, like shock absorbers. In time, they become worn, and they no longer offer as much protection as before.

A disc that bulges between the vertebrae is known as a herniated disc.

Medical treatment options include injecting the joints next to the damaged disc with steroids and a local anesthetic. These are called facet joint injections. They can provide effective pain relief.

Diabetic neuropathy refers to the damage that affects the nerves of the body in people who have diabetes. It is a progressive disease, and symptoms worsen over a number of years. People who do not control their blood sugar levels and those who have high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, or who are overweight are more susceptible. Neuropathy can affect any nerve in the body, but especially the nerves of the ganglia, the outside of the skull, the spinal cord, and those that impact the functioning of fundamental organs, such as the heart, bladder, intestines, and stomach.

Problems can occur in the nerves that control the periphery, or outside, of the body, such as the feet and hands, those that control the automatic functions of the body, such as heart rate and digestion, or just one or a small group of nerves.

Around 60 percent to 70 percent of people with diabetes develop diabetic neuropathy.

Millions of Americans live with chronic headache and migraine pain. There are many different types of headaches and many causes. Some headaches are caused by stress, food, weather, body mechanics or genetic disposition. There are a range of medical techniques available that can prevent or treat chronic headaches.

A common source of back or neck pain is a herniated disk. Sometimes called a “slipped” or “ruptured” disk, this condition most often occurs in the lower back, as well as the smaller disks in the neck. Although a herniated disk can sometimes be very painful, most people feel much better with just a few months of simple, nonsurgical treatments. Disks are soft, rubbery pads found between the hard bones (vertebrae) that make up the spinal column. The disks between the vertebrae allow the back to flex or bend. Disks also act as shock absorbers.

In children and young adults, disks have high water content. As people age, the water content in the disks decreases and the disks become less flexible. The disks begin to shrink and the spaces between the vertebrae get narrower. Conditions that can weaken the disk include:

  • Improper lifting
  • Smoking
  • Excessive body weight that places added stress on the disks (in the lower back)
  • Sudden pressure (which may be slight)
  • Repetitive strenuous activities

Disks in the lumbar spine (low back) are composed of a thick outer ring of cartilage (annulus) and an inner gel-like substance (nucleus). In the cervical spine (neck), the disks are similar but smaller in size.

A disk herniates or ruptures when part of the center nucleus pushes through the outer edge of the disk and back toward the spinal canal. This puts pressure on the nerves. Spinal nerves are very sensitive to even slight amounts of pressure, which can result in pain, numbness, or weakness in one or both legs or arms. Other symptoms can include tingling (a pins-and-needles sensation) or burning sensation.

Extremity pain is one of the most common pain complaints. With overuse, wear and tear, and the daily stress that people endure, it’s no wonder that the difficulties of modern life are manifesting themselves in our arms and legs.

Your lower extremities, including the legs, feet, and ankles are controlled by nerves beginning in the lower back and spine. Pain in these areas can be caused by wrong form or position of the body—in which case, it will eventually resolve when the position is changed or the pain may be episodic. In the latter case, the pain usually results from a trauma or mechanical stress. Aside from injury, leg and ankle pain may also be caused by arthritis or infection. Foot pain can also result from disease.

One’s upper extremities: arms, wrists, shoulders, neck can be injured not only through overuse but also due to daily wear-and-tear. The shoulders and wrists, in particular, are very commonly affected, and the type and occurrence of pain may vary depending on the kind of injury.

Facet Joint syndrome is pain at the joint between two vertebrae in your spine. Another term for facet joint syndrome is osteoarthritis.

The facet joints are the joints in your spine that make your back flexible and enable you to bend and twist. Nerves exit your spinal cord through these joints on their way to other parts of your body. Healthy facet joints have cartilage, which allows your vertebrae to move smoothly against each other without grinding. Each joint is lubricated with synovial fluid for additional protection against wear and tear. When your facet joints become swollen and painful due to osteoarthritis, it is called facet joint syndrome.

Facet joint syndrome can be caused by a combination of aging, pressure overload of your facet joints, and injury. An injection into your facet joint can be helpful for calming pain and inflammation. The injection usually gives temporary relief for several weeks or months.

Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain accompanied by fatigue, sleep, memory and mood issues. Researchers believe that fibromyalgia amplifies painful sensations by affecting the way your brain processes pain signals. Symptoms sometimes begin after a physical trauma, surgery, infection or significant psychological stress. In other cases, symptoms gradually accumulate over time with no single triggering event.

Women are more likely to develop fibromyalgia than are men. Many people who have fibromyalgia also have tension headaches, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, anxiety and depression.

While there is no cure for fibromyalgia, there are a range of treatment options that are effective. In addition, exercise, relaxation and stress-reduction measures also may help.

Lumbar refers to the low back region. Nerve roots exit the back to enter the legs. Nerve roots branch out from the spinal cord and carry messages to and from the brain and the lower extremities and pelvis. If one of these roots is sick or injured in the area where it leaves the spine, it is called a radiculopathy. Symptoms usually arise in people between the ages of 30 and 50 and may follow an injury or occur with no warning. Sciatica is pain that radiates from the back down the back of the leg, and is a common manifestation of lumbar radiculopathy. Other common symptoms are numbness and tingling of the leg or foot, weakness, and muscle spasms. 80% to 90% of patients with sciatica recover without surgery.

Many disease states can cause lumbar radiculopathy, but most often it is a structural problem like a herniated disc, bone spur, or mechanical stretching or traumatic event. Discs may be damaged from strenuous activity, a congenital defect, or by injury. When the disc is damaged, material in the disc leaks and squeezes the nerve root. This can cause the numbness, tingling, pain, and weakness.

Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a fancy way to describe muscle pain. It refers to pain and inflammation in the body’s soft tissues.

MPS is a chronic condition that affects the fascia (connective tissue that covers the muscles). It may involve either a single muscle or a muscle group. In some cases, the area where a person experiences the pain may not be where the myofascial pain generator is located. Experts believe that the actual site of the injury or the strain prompts the development of a trigger point that, in turn, causes pain in other areas. This situation is known as referred pain.

Osteoporosis is a bone disease that occurs when the body loses too much bone, makes too little bone, or both. As a result, bones become weak and may break from a fall or, in serious cases, from sneezing or minor bumps.

Osteoporosis means “porous bone.” Viewed under a microscope, healthy bone looks like a honeycomb. When osteoporosis occurs, the holes and spaces in the honeycomb are much larger than in healthy bone. Osteoporotic bones have lost density or mass and contain abnormal tissue structure. As bones become less dense, they weaken and are more likely to break. If you’re 50 or older and have broken a bone, ask your doctor or healthcare provider about a bone density test.

The warning signals sent by a pinched nerve may cause a few different symptoms in the body, especially in the area around the nerve.

A pinched nerve may cause weakness, pain, tingling, or numbness.

Signs and symptoms of a pinched nerve include tingling, burning, numbness, pain, muscle weakness, stinging pain, such as pins and needles or feeling like the area may have “fallen asleep.” Symptoms may also be worse while lying down or just after waking up. A pinched nerve also puts a person more at risk for other problems. Symptoms of sciatica, tennis elbow, and carpal tunnel syndrome may appear in people with a pinched nerve. Pinched nerves can occur anywhere in the body but happen most often in the neck, back, elbows, and wrists.

Post-laminectomy syndrome is very complex and refers to a person experiencing pain after a prior spinal surgery (not necessarily even a laminectomy). As such, there are many different forms that this condition can take. Some possible variations include: the patient had spinal surgery, recovered well, and now has developed a new and unrelated spinal problem, the patient had spinal surgery, and despite the procedure going well, the original pain did not go away or the patient had spinal surgery, and developed a complication such as an infection, nerve injury, or failure to heal.

Low back or neck pain- what we call axial spinal pain- is a common symptom in post-laminectomy syndrome. We usually attribute this pain to an abnormality in one of the structures in or around the spinal column, and it has several possible causes, including:

  • Muscle spasm due to trauma or poor muscle conditioning
  • Arthritis of the spinal (facet) joints
  • Disc herniation
  • Painful instrumentation (for example, when metal has been used to secure a spinal fusion)
  • Surgical complications such as bleeding or infection

Patients with post-laminectomy syndrome may also complain of neurologic symptoms radiating to areas distant from the spine- most often the arms or legs. Neurologic pain can reproduce any normal sensation such as heat, cold, or electricity, but is being produced by the injured nerves themselves, rather than by sensing an actual problem in the extremity.

Spinal pain is often generated from inside the vertebral column itself and can often be diagnosed and treated by using fluoroscopically guided injections.

Pain that occurs after surgery is an important concern. Before your surgery, you and your surgeon may have discussed how much pain you should expect and how it will be managed. Several factors determine how much pain you have and how to manage it. Different types of surgeries and surgical cuts (incisions) cause different types and amounts of pain afterward. A longer and more invasive surgery, besides causing more pain, can take more out of you. Recovering from these other effects of surgery can make it harder to deal with the pain.

RSD is an older term used to describe one form of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). Both RSD and CRPS are chronic conditions characterized by severe burning pain, most often affecting one of the extremities (arms, legs, hands, or feet). There are often pathological changes in bone and skin, excessive sweating, tissue swelling and extreme sensitivity to touch, known as allodynia.

RSD is sometimes called Type I CRPS, which is triggered by tissue injury where there is no underlying nerve injury, while Type II CRPS refers to cases where a high-velocity impact (such as a bullet wound) occurred at the site and is clearly associated with nerve injury. Type II used to be called “causalgia” and was first documented over 100 years ago by doctors concerned about the pain that Civil War veterans suffered even after their wounds had healed. RSD is unusual in that it affects the nerves, skin, muscles, blood vessels and bones at the same time.

While the cause of RSD is not known, the condition is thought to be a malfunctioning of the sympathetic nervous system, but some researchers are questioning this. Since RSD most often follows trauma to the extremities, some conditions that can trigger RSD are sprains, fractures, surgery, damage to blood vessels or nerves and certain brain injuries.

There is a wide range of potential treatment options for most rotator cuff injuries. Partial and degenerative rotator cuff injuries often respond to rest and rehabilitation. If rest, rehabilitation, and other non-invasive treatments do not work, injections may be recommended.Surgery is typically reserved for patients with complete or high-grade tears of the rotator cuff.Typical management of rotator cuff muscle and tendon injuries requires patients to demonstrate patience and consistent effort. This approach has three phases:

  • Protection and pain-control phase
  • Restorative phase, which addresses range of motion and strength deficits
  • Integrative phase, which incorporates sports-specific activities

The initial treatment for rotator cuff injuries involves pain control and relative rest. Adequate pain management is typically achieved with anti-inflammatory medications or cortisone injections.

The patient may need to wear a brace or sling to limit shoulder movement. Immobilization of the shoulder should be as brief as possible, even with complete tears. Immobilization for long periods can lead to further complications, such as the loss of range of motion and a painful condition called adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder).

Sciatica is a medical condition characterized by pain going down the leg from the lower back. This pain may go down the back, outside, or front of the leg. Onset is often sudden following activities like heavy lifting, though gradual onset may also occur. Typically, symptoms are only on one side of the body. Certain causes, however, may result in pain on both sides. Lower back pain is sometimes but not always present. Weakness or numbness may occur in various parts of the affected leg and foot. Treatment initially is typically with pain medications. It is generally recommended that people continue with activities to the best of their abilities.

Scoliosis is an abnormal curve in the spine. There are several types of scoliosis based on the cause and age when the curve develops; the majority of patients have no known cause. The most common symptom of scoliosis is curvature of the spine. Scoliosis risk factors include age (9- to 15-year-olds), female sex, and family history. Diagnosis is done by the physical exam and by imaging techniques such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI. Depending on the severity of the curve and the risk for it getting worse, scoliosis can be treated with observation, bracing, or surgery.

Orthopedic surgeons or neurosurgeons are often consulted if surgery is needed. The prognosis for an individual with scoliosis ranges from mainly good to fair, depending on how early the problem is diagnosed and treated. There is no cure for scoliosis, but the symptoms can be reduced.

Shingles is a viral infection that causes a painful rash. Although shingles can occur anywhere on your body, it most often appears as a single stripe of blisters that wraps around either the left or the right side of your torso.

Shingles is caused by the varicella-zoster virus — the same virus that causes chickenpox. After you’ve had chickenpox, the virus lies inactive in nerve tissue near your spinal cord and brain. Years later, the virus may reactivate as shingles.

While it isn’t a life-threatening condition, shingles can be very painful. Vaccines can help reduce the risk of shingles, while early treatment can help shorten a shingles infection and lessen the chance of complications.

Shingles is characterized by pain or a tingling sensation in a limited area on one side of the face or torso, followed by a red rash with small, fluid-filled blisters.

The signs and symptoms of shingles usually affect only a small section of one side of your body. These signs and symptoms may include:

  • Pain, burning, numbness or tingling
  • Sensitivity to touch
  • A red rash that begins a few days after the pain
  • Fluid-filled blisters that break open and crust over
  • Itching
  • Some people also experience:
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Fatigue

Factors that may increase your risk of developing shingles include:

  • Being older than 50. Shingles is most common in people older than 50. The risk increases with age. Some experts estimate that half the people age 80 and older will have shingles.
  • Having certain diseases. Diseases that weaken your immune system, such as HIV/AIDS and cancer, can increase your risk of shingles.
  • Undergoing cancer treatments. Radiation or chemotherapy can lower your resistance to diseases and may trigger shingles.
  • Taking certain medications. Drugs designed to prevent rejection of transplanted organs can increase your risk of shingles — as can prolonged use of steroids, such as prednisone.

Shoulder impingement is a common cause of shoulder pain. It’s also known as impingement syndrome or swimmer’s shoulder, since it’s common in swimmers. It’s also common in other athletes who use their shoulders a lot, such as baseball or softball players.

Your rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that attach your upper arm bone to your shoulder. They help you lift and rotate your arm. The rotator cuff sits under the top of the shoulder, which is called the acromion. If you have shoulder impingement, your rotator cuff catches or rubs against the acromion. When you lift your arm, the space (bursa) between the rotator cuff and acromion narrows, which increases the pressure. The increased pressure irritates the rotator cuff, leading to impingement.

The main symptom of shoulder impingement is sudden pain in your shoulder when you lift your arm overhead or backward. Other symptoms include: minor but constant pain in your arm, pain that goes from the front of your shoulder to the side of your arm, pain that gets worse at night, shoulder or arm weakness.

Many cases of shoulder impingement are caused by overuse. Repeated use of the shoulder can make the tendons in your shoulder swell, leading them to “catch” on your upper shoulder bone. In other cases, there’s no known cause.

Playing sports that require using your shoulders for overhead or forceful motion is the biggest risk factor for developing shoulder impingement.

Occupations that require lots of heavy lifting or arm movement also increase your risk. Both old age and previous shoulder injuries, such as a dislocation, are also risk factors for shoulder impingement. Some people also have an unusually shaped acromion that increases their risk.

Spondylolisthesis is a spinal condition that affects the lower vertebrae (spinal bones). This disease causes one of the lower vertebrae to slip forward onto the bone directly beneath it. It’s a painful condition but treatable in most cases. Both therapeutic and surgical methods may be used. Proper exercise techniques can help you avoid this condition.

The symptoms of spondylolisthesis vary. People with mild cases may not have any symptoms. However, those with severe cases may be unable to perform daily activities. Some of the most common symptoms are: persistent lower back pain, stiffness in your back and legs, lower back tenderness, thigh pain, tight hamstring and buttock muscles.

Causes of spondylolisthesis vary based on age, heredity, and lifestyle. Children may suffer from this condition as the result of a birth defect or injury. However, people of all ages are susceptible if the condition runs in the family. Rapid growth during adolescence may also be a contributing factor.

Playing sports may also cause your strain to overstretch and put stress on your lower back. Spondylolysis is often a precursor to spondylolisthesis. Spondylolysis occurs when there is a fracture in a vertebra, but it hasn’t yet fallen onto a lower bone in your spine.

The treatment for spondylolisthesis depends on your severity of pain and vertebra slippage. Nonsurgical treatments can help ease pain and encourage the bone to go back into place. It’s important to avoid contact sports during the healing process.

People of all ages enjoy sports at school, with friends or may play professionally. During active exercise and sports it is not uncommon to fall, trip, impact with another player or overuse and overextend muscles. Usually these can be treated fairly easily and would not require surgery unless there is a break or significant tear.

Your spine, or backbone, protects your spinal cord and allows you to stand and bend. Spinal stenosis causes narrowing in your spine. The narrowing puts pressure on your nerves and spinal cord and can cause pain.

Spinal stenosis occurs mostly in people older than 50. Younger people with a spine injury or a narrow spinal canal are also at risk. Diseases such as arthritis and scoliosis can cause spinal stenosis, too. Symptoms might appear gradually or not at all. They include pain in your neck or back, numbness, weakness, cramping, or pain in your arms or legs, pain going down the leg or foot problems.

Millions of Americans have ongoing back pain. It’s the leading cause of disability in people younger than 45, and many things can cause it.

Back pain often happens because something is off in the way your spinal joints, muscles, discs, and nerves fit together and move.

Your doctor can check to see if you have:

  • Herniated or slipped discs: If your doctor mentions this, the soft tissue in the discs between your joints has come out. It’s usually caused by wear and tear. Herniated discs can cause pain in your lower back or hip because the nerves there are pressed.
  • Bulging discs: These protrude, or “bulge,” but not as much as with a herniated disc. You don’t usually have symptoms with this. You’ll feel it if it pushes on a nerve root, though.
  • Degenerative disc disease: The discs, or “shock absorbers” between your spine’s vertebrae, shrink or tear. That causes the bones to rub together. This may happen as you get older.
  • Inflammation and wear of the sacroiliac joint: This lies where your spine and pelvis come together. It doesn’t move much, but it’s important because it moves the load of the upper body to the lower body. Swelling and wearing away of the joint cartilage can happen after an injury, because of arthritis, infection, or even pregnancy.
  • Spondylolisthesis: A bone in the spine slips forward and out of place, typically in the lower back. The degenerative form of this condition is arthritis, which weakens the joints and ligaments keeping the spine aligned. It can cause a disc to move forward over a vertebra.

Car accidents, falls, muscle sprains, strains, and fractures are also causes of back pain. Injuries can lead to some of the physical problems, but some can cause pain all on their own.

Shoulder bursitis is an inflamed shoulder bursa. Your bursa is a fluid-filled sac that helps to reduce friction in your shoulder spaces. You have several bursae within your shoulder. Your subacromial bursa is the most commonly inflamed of the shoulder bursa.

Subacromial bursitis is a common cause of shoulder pain that is usually related to shoulder impingement of your bursa between your rotator cuff tendons and bone (acromion). Your subdeltoid bursa is a less commonly inflamed shoulder bursa.

Tendinitis, also known as tendonitis, is the inflammation of a tendon. It happens when a person overuses or injures a tendon, for example, during sport. It is normally linked to an acute injury with inflammation.

It often affects the elbow, wrist, finger, thigh, and other parts of the body. The body part that is involved may give the injury its name, for example, Achilles tendinitis. Familiar terms are tennis or golfer’s elbow, jumper’s knee, and pitcher’s shoulder. Tendinitis can occur at any age, but it is more common among adults who do a lot of sport. Older people are also susceptible, because the tendons tend to lose elasticity and become weaker with age.

Tendinosis has similar symptoms, but it is a chronic, or long-term, condition, and it is degenerative.

Tendinitis usually happens when overuse or injury puts strain on the tendons.

Common name includes Achilles tendonitis, tennis elbow, and housemaid’s knee.

Without treatment, it can result in a rupture, which may need surgery.

Viscosupplementation is a medical procedure during which lubricating fluid is injected into a joint. Also called hyaluronic acid injections or hyaluronan injections, viscosupplementation is most commonly used to treat symptoms of symptoms of knee osteoarthritis.

Hyaluronic acid is a key component of the joint fluid in healthy joints, but is found in lower concentrations in osteoarthritic joints. Adding hyaluronic acid to the existing joint fluid of an osteoarthritic knee, the goal is to:

  • Facilitate better knee movement
  • Reduce pain
  • Perhaps slow osteoarthritis progression

Typical candidates for viscosupplementation are people with knee osteoarthritis who have failed to improve with other non-surgical treatments.

Following the injections, it is generally recommended that patients engage in a rehabilitation program that includes gentle, progressive knee exercise. The goals of rehabilitation are to improve range of motion and develop muscle strength to support the knee.

adding hyaluronic acid to the existing joint fluid of an osteoarthritic knee, the goal is to:

  • Facilitate better knee movement
  • Reduce pain
  • Perhaps slow osteoarthritis progression

Typical candidates for viscosupplementation are people with knee osteoarthritis who have failed to improve with other non-surgical treatments.

Following the injections, it is generally recommended that patients engage in a rehabilitation program that includes gentle, progressive knee exercise. The goals of rehabilitation are to improve range of motion and develop muscle strength to support the knee.

Whiplash may also be known as Cervical Acceleration/Deceleration (CAD) Syndrome, and it is a painful condition that occurs when the neck is hyperextended past its normal range of motion. Whiplash injury typically occurs after an automobile accident or impact from a high-contact sport like football or rugby. Several treatment modalities may be employed to provide complete pain relief.

Many people get hurt on the job. Maybe a fall, a slip or strain. Those individuals who stand on their feet every day, lift and carry heavy items or just have an accident are able to contact Workers Compensation for assistance in receiving treatment. Try and be as safe as possible at your job, taking care of yourself while doing a great job. If you do get hurt, you should report it and seek treatment.

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